Learning Camera Controls

During the camera controls lessons, I learned the basics to operating a DSLR camera in manual mode. The most important functions of a camera’s manual mode is controlling the aperture, shutter speed, and ISO. These three features work together to create reciprocity.

The aperture, or F-stop, is used to control the depth of field. This is measured in stops. To achieve a shallow depth of field, a photojournalist should set the aperture to be open at a two or four. To achieve a wide depth of field, a photojournalist should set the aperture to be closed at 16, 22, or 32. Depth of field can be controlled in three ways, the aperture, the focal length, and with the lens the photojournalist chooses to use.

The shutter speed determines how fast or slow the shutter captures the image. The shutter speed is important because it controls motion and light. Shutter speeds are also measured in stops. A slower shutter speed, such as 1/30 will allow the camera to let more light in, and will capture a blurred or panned motion. A faster shutter speed, such as ¼ will allow the camera to let less light in and stops action. When capturing a slow action shot, it is unwise to try to hand hold a camera when using a shutter speed 1/30 and slower. A blurred action shot will capture an image where the subject appears to be moving, but the background is still. A panned action shot will capture an image where the subject is still, but the background is blurred or streaked. A stopped action shot will capture an image of an action that is completely frozen.

The ISO is measures how sensitive the camera is to the light level. ISO stands for International Standard Association. The ISO is important because if you have a lower ISO, you will have a lower amount of grain in your image. Light exposure is very important in photojournalism. If you set your camera to a low ISO setting, you will not have a lot light. If you set your camera to a high ISO setting, you will have a lot of light. If a picture is over exposed the camera meter will tell you. The histogram, is the camera’s built in exposure tool. The histogram will alert the photojournalist if the exposure needs to be adjusted. This is important because it allows the journalist to attempt to fix exposure issues before taking the picture, opposed to after. A camera meters the world at 18% grey. To meter a camera properly, the photojournalist should find something as close to 18% grey as possible. White reflects light, and can lead to overexposure. Black absorbs light, and can lead to underexposure.

The lens a photojournalist chooses to use is also very important, as it can determine the type of image that will be captured. There are six different types of lens: fixed, telephoto, zoom, fixed zoom, variable, and prime. Variable lens, while not recommended for professional use, are the lens that come with most beginner camera bundles.

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First Amendment Rights for Photojournalist and Students

The First Amendment: Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

As a collegiate photojournalism student, it is important to have a working knowledge of what is and isn’t ethical. Journalist must know their rights, as it is their job, by definition to report and document current events and issues. Photojournalist must also have a working knowledge of who, what and where they can record history.

All journalist must understand that under the first amendment, they have the right to photograph in the public sphere. According to Photojournalism: A Professional’s Approach, photojournalist have the right to photograph politicians, celebrities, and everyday people in public places. This could cause for friction in police situations, but authorities don’t have the right to confiscate photojournalist’s camera or photography equipment.

“However, police and fire officials are permitted to restrict newsgathering conduct if the photographer disrupts the pending investigation or activity,” according to Photojournalism: A Professional’s Approach.

On a collegiate level, practicing photojournalist have the right to photograph on the campus of a public school. The law allows photojournalist to shoot on public campuses, but private areas such as dorms, and common bathrooms have limitations. Public high schools and middle schools also have limitations for photojournalist. According to Photojournalism: A Professional’s Approach, high and middle schools fall under its principal’s jurisdiction. Meaning, the principal determines who can shoot on the school’s grounds.

The ethics of photojournalism, as described by the text, Photojournalism: A Professionals Approach, usually falls under three categories: Utilitarian, Absolutist, and The Golden Rule.

Utilitarian is described by ethicists as “the greatest good for the greatest amount of people.” Professionals generally follow this framework for photojournalism. When it comes to deciding whether to run a photo or not, the Utilitarian approach determines if the photo will be critical as an influence on a democratic society.

The Absolutist approach, is the ethical framework that relies on privacy. This principle says that despite the greater good that may come from publishing personal photo, the person or people photographed have a right to privacy. This principle adheres to an individual’s absolute right to privacy.

The Golden Rule principle is the approach that precept, “do unto others as you would have them do unto you.” According to the text, the major problem with The Golden Rule principle is you don’t know exactly how someone else feels, and ultimately your imposing your feelings on others.

As a photojournalist, it is important to follow the Utilitarian model. This principle follows the closest to the principles of photojournalism. As journalist, we are supposed to remain objective and unbiased. As a photojournalist, I aim to photograph ethically, and use judgements that will benefit society.

Overall, as the text stated, when it comes to shooting ethically, it is important to remember, you can always take a picture and not publish it. Shoot instinctively.

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COM2100 – At Wayne State Bad Things Can Happen to Good People Like You

Word Count: 724

 

At Wayne State Bad Things Can Happen to Good People Like You

By: Brittanii Lyons

Wayne State University

Com 2100 November 1, 2017

 

The Wayne State University Police Department works diligently to provide crime prevention programs and resources. The Wayne State police department’s website lists all of its programs, from its most popular Rape Aggression Defense classes to its VIN etching.

Continue reading “COM2100 – At Wayne State Bad Things Can Happen to Good People Like You”

COM2100 – WSU Student’s Struggle of Turning a Passion into a Paycheck

Word Count: 420

 

WSU Student’s Struggle of Turning a Passion into a Paycheck

By: Brittanii Lyons

Wayne State University

Comm 2100 Sept. 18, 2017

 

 

As a college student the hardest decision is choosing a major. Most college students change their major at least once, and some will change it multiple times before deciding which  that fits best.

The struggle of finding which career path will fuel your passion and your pockets is no different for Wayne State University student David Applebaum. Continue reading “COM2100 – WSU Student’s Struggle of Turning a Passion into a Paycheck”

COM2100 – WSU Hosts a Lecture on the Evolution of the Birth Control Pill.

Word Count: 545

WSU Hosts a Lecture on the Evolution of the Birth Control Pill.

By: Brittanii Lyons

Wayne State University

Comm. 2100 October 2, 2017

 

 

The idea of couples using contraceptives dates back to the early 1800’s, but it wouldn’t be until the popularity of the birth control pill in the 1970’s that would revolutionize the role of women. Continue reading “COM2100 – WSU Hosts a Lecture on the Evolution of the Birth Control Pill.”